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Tampa Bay Fly Fishing Club
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TIPS FOR TBFFC - No. 109

 

 

Casting tip no. 91

How can you see a fly that small? While fishing for Cutthroat trout with some friends in Montana recently, I was asked this question. Success during most of that particular day depended on very selective fish in low, clear, slow moving water. My largest dry fly was a size 18, nymphs and emergers down to size 24. An accurate drag free long cast was needed to sighted fish or rises. My answer was, "When I can't see the fly, I watch the fish." I could see where my cast placed the fly, usually a few feet above the fish. As it drifted in his vicinity, if I saw the fish rise or move and feed I set the hook. The fish are always our best teachers.

Capt. Pat Damico Text Box:

Random Thoughts from the Tying Bench

By C.W. “Don” Coleman

•All-white flies work very well. White best reflects the colors of a baitfish’s surroundings, just like the scales on a baitfish. When held out of water in white light, baitfish do not look the same as they do underwater where their color is constantly changing from reflected light.

P.S. Ted Hagaman tied some all white minnow patterns for baby tarpon down in Charlott Harbor and they worked like a charm. And, white has always been a good snook fly. //Walt

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